The URC?

The United Reformed Church (URC) was originally formed in 1972 by the union of the Congregational Church and the Presbyterian Church of England. It’s commitment to the visible unity of the whole Christian church is expressed through a series of unions over the past 40 years, which has brought together English Presbyterians, English, Welsh and Scottish Congregationalists and members of the Churches of Christ. It was the first (and is still the only) union of Churches across traditional denominational lines in England since the Reformation.
The URC now consists of more than 1500 congregations throughout Britain, representing a community totalling some 60,000 people, served by around 550 ministers, both men and women, paid and unpaid. Although one of the smaller mainstream denominations in Britain, the URC plays a dynamic and challenging part in the country’s Christian life. It seeks to work with Christians of all traditions. It is committed to theological and cultural diversity. The URC is part of the world-wide Reformed communion - the largest strand in Protestantism, with some 70 million members.

A URC Statement of Faith is here and Christ Churches Mission and Identity Statement.

Christ Church, Rayleigh is part of the Eastern Synod of the United Reformed Church, which in turn is one of thirteen Synods (11 provincial in England, and 2 national in Scotland and Wales). The Synod serves the local URC churches in Eastern England, many of which are linked with other denominations, thus expressing our goal of unity in God's mission. Local URC inter-church fellowship and decision-making are fostered through the Area Partnerships.
The Synod Council, comprised of both ministers and lay representatives from the local churches. It meets twice a year for worship together, fellowship, discussion and decision-making. The Synod Moderator - Revd Paul Whittle - chairs these bi-annual meetings.